Stop Letting Your Bladder Control Your Day!

It’s so embarrassing those who suffer from it frequently become reclusive. Losing control of your bladder is not a disease, and it isn’t related to getting older.

Urinary tract infections, constipation, and certain medications and health disorders can affect a person’s ability to control their bladder. Incontinence can be treated with medications, surgery, or even artificial devices.

But a few exercises and practical tips go a long way in ensuring that this problem stays away.

If you are already suffering from urinary incontinence, note what you eat and drink, and at what time of the day. Also make a note of how often and at what time you are unable to control your bladder. Your doctor will be able to find out what kind of incontinence you have:

Types of Incontinence

  • Stress incontinence: Leaking urine while undertaking physical activity, coughing, sneezing, or laughing, which puts sudden and unexpected pressure on the bladder. This problem affects younger women who have just been through childbirth and those who are experiencing the onset of menopause.
  • Stress incontinence: Leaking urine while undertaking physical activity, coughing, sneezing, or laughing, which puts sudden and unexpected pressure on the bladder. This problem affects younger women who have just been through childbirth and those who are experiencing the onset of menopause.
  • Urge incontinence: Most people can control the urge to urinate if a lavatory is not accessible. But sometimes, those who have diabetes, or have suffered from a stroke, or Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, or multiple sclerosis may be unable to control the urge and therefore leak urine. Certain drugs such as, antidepressants, diuretics, tranquilizers and high blood pressure medicines can stress the bladder-wall muscle.
  • Overflow incontinence: Men with an enlarged prostate may experience that a little urine leaks from a full bladder. Diabetics could also suffer from this type of incontinence.
  • Functional incontinence: Most common in people with Arthritis and bone disorders, Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s disease that curb one’s movements, thinking, or ability to communicate – making it difficult or impossible to reach the lavatory in time.
  • Mixed incontinence: Most common in women. Usually stress and urge incontinence.
    Anatomic or developmental incontinence: Caused by a physical or neurological abnormality or damage due to trauma or disease.
  • Because of pregnancy & childbirth, menopause, and the structure of the female urinary tract, women experience incontinence twice as often as men.

8 Ways to Improve Bladder Control

  • Kegel exercises: Arnold Kegel developed a series of exercises in the late 1940s that helped pregnant women overcome stress incontinence. But, they are used today by almost anyone to control the bladder and bowel movements. For at least 2 minutes – 3 times a day, follow these exercises:
  • a) Relax your muscles and imagine that you are holding back a bowel movement by tightening the anal muscles.
    b) When urinating, stop the flow, and restart it.
    c) Sit or lie down with your knees slightly apart and tighten the pelvic muscles for at least 2 seconds, relax for 2 seconds and repeat this 10 times. Gradually, hold and relax the muscles for about 10 seconds each time.
  • Watch your fluid intake: If your diary shows that you have been having lots of fluids (coffee, juices, soups, etc) you may need to cut it down, at least before bedtime or just before a long journey. However, take care that you do not cut away too much and dehydrate yourself.
  • Look out for diuretics: Alcohol, caffeine and grape juice are well-known diuretics that increase the urge to urinate.
  • Seize opportunities… To relieve yourself. Holding it in for too long in social gatherings or during meetings may lead to an infection or overstretch the bladder. Get into the habit of relieving yourself at regular intervals.
  • After you urinate, wait for a few seconds and stand up and sit down again. Double voiding usually works for those who do not feel relieved even after urinating.
  • Stop smoking. The nicotine irritates the bladder and the lungs. A sudden cough could lead to a loss of bladder control. Smoking also raises your blood pressure causing increased urine production.
  • Cranberries juice or capsules significantly reduce urinary tract infections and also alleviate the symptoms of urinary tract illness. It also deodorizes urine and inhibits the adhesion of dangerous micro-organisms that stick to the urinary tract.
  • Watch your weight: Fat deposits put a lot of pressure on the bladder and pelvic muscles. Studies have found that those who suffer from incontinence and then shed excess weight, are able to control their bladder better.

 

Stop Letting Your Bladder Control Your Day! was last modified: by

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